Christine: “Let’s be brave enough to be the light our Earth needs”

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

Gadfly takes note of the Morning Call voices of followers Fox and Christine urging us to pursue solutions to the problems associated with climate change and reminding him that the Bethlehem Climate Action Plan is on the verge of rolling out.

By the way, did you see the climate change interview with Bill Gates on 60 Minutes last night? Very provocative.

Becky Bradley, “Going Green is an investment in our economy.” Morning Call, February 4, 2021.

Amanda Gorman, “Earthrise”

Reminder! Draft Climate Action Plan now available for review and comment: January 6 deadline

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

City Climate Action Plan page

The draft Climate Action Plan
Public comment form: January 6 deadline

The penultimate step in the process to develop a Climate Action Plan for our city is upon us.

The full final draft of the CAP is now available on the City web site.

‘Tis there for your perusal, and comments and questions will be taken till January 6.

We can look forward to the implementation of the CAP shortly thereafter.

The CAP is really quite a forward looking achievement.

And Gadfly bets a lot of people said it couldn’t be done.

And now it’s another thing that makes Bethlehem a special place.

With the President-elect Biden Administration, we can look forward to renewed action and support at the national level.

Get your “two cents” in by January 6.

Draft Climate Action Plan now available for review and comment

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

City Climate Action Plan page

The draft Climate Action Plan
Public comment form: January 6 deadline

The penultimate step in the process to develop a Climate Action Plan for our city is upon us.

The full final draft of the CAP is now available on the City web site.

‘Tis there for your perusal, and comments and questions will be taken till January 6.

We can look forward to the implementation of the CAP shortly thereafter.

Gadfly has told the story several times in these pages of looking for some sort of comprehensive planning document, political agenda, or vision statement when he first donned his wings 2+ years ago.

In what direction was the City heading, he wondered? What goals were we working toward?

What he discovered was Councilman Reynolds’ Bethlehem 2017 document.

And in that interesting and impressive document you will find the genesis of the Climate Action Plan.

The dream of 2017 becomes the reality of 2021.

Pretty damn good.

Gadfly tips his hat to the productive ensemble of Councilman Reynolds, Mayor Donchez, Public Works Director Alkhal, Deputy Public Works Director Dorner, other City staffers, Lynn Rothman and the Environmental Advisory Council, and consultants Jeff from WSP and Kate from the Nurture Nature Center.

The CAP is really quite a forward looking achievement.

And Gadfly bets a lot of people said it couldn’t be done.

And now it’s another thing that makes Bethlehem a special place.

Councilman Reynolds called the development of the CAP “historic.”

Yep.

The CAP: environmental justice, outreach, green space

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

Climate Action Plan

Here are a few more of the interesting elements of the CAP.

Create and Environmental Justice Council

audio unavailable

Initiate a “Bethlehem Climate Challenge” public outreach/educational program

Evaluate existing green space sales with goals of the CAP

Climate Action Plan

The CAP: community gardens, net-zero new buildings, curbside composting

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

Climate Action Plan

The draft of the historic Climate Action Plan contains several specific strategies that we’ll give you a taste of over two or three posts. Gadfly is sorry that he can’t do better on the print size, but the short audios should fill you in. The full report will soon be on the City web site, and Gadfly will advise you when.

Support local gardens and urban farms

Implement net-zero emissions standards for new buildings

Create a curbside composting program

Climate Action Plan

CAP: look forward to an Office of Sustainability

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

Climate Action Plan

Councilman Reynolds has talked several times of ultimately the need for a Sustainability Director and an Office of Sustainability. Gadfly would say look for discussion of these things fairly soon in the new year. Wonder what the budget ramifications are. Can it be done by reassignments of existing staff? Gadfly remembers that knowledge of sustainability was discussed in regard to the fairly recent hire of the Recycling head.

Consultant Jeff (2 mins.):

 

 

Climate Action Plan

to be continued . . .

The CAP: pinpointing the problem sources, setting goals

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

Climate Action Plan

What contributes to Greenhouse Gas emissions in Bethlehem? Electricity is the biggest contributor.

Consultant Jeff (1 min.):

 

And, then, most importantly, what are our goals? What are we committing ourselves to and when? Looks pretty ambitious!

Consultant Jeff (2 mins.):

Remember that Gadfly will let you know when the draft is up on the City website to view and comment on.

Home stretch on the historic Climate Action Plan

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

“This is a really exciting time for us. . . . I really think this is going to be an historic document for the City of Bethlehem.”
Councilman Reynolds

Climate Action Plan

This ain’t chopped liver, my followers!

Yesterday in the third public meeting of the development process, the draft of the Climate Action Plan was presented. Prime players Councilman Reynolds and Deputy Director of Public Works Matt Dorner were in attendance. The draft will soon be on the City web site, and further public comment is possible there through January 6. And shortly thereafter the Plan will be released and operation will begin.

Councilman Reynolds introduction (2 mins.):

 

Consultant Jeff on the working groups (2 mins.):

 

Consultant Jeff on vision and principles (3 mins.):

Gadfly will post on a few highlights of yesterday’s meeting and will advise you when the draft is available for perusal and comment on the City web site.

Climate Action Plan

Drum roll! Draft Climate Action Plan debuts December 9 — THAT’S TOMORROW! SIGN UP!

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

Full Description here

register here

The City of Bethlehem will host an online forum on Wednesday, December 9, to present a draft of the City’s Climate Action Plan. The Plan, which is being developed throughout 2020, will outline measures, policies, and strategies the City can support to reduce Bethlehem’s contribution to climate change and to adapt to the risks of a changing climate, such as extreme temperatures.

During the online forum, the City and consultants WSP and Nurture Nature Center will introduce the draft of Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan, including its objectives, strategies, and proposed implementation approach. The Plan addresses a range of sectors, from buildings to transportation to education, with a focus on environmental justice considerations. Participants will then be asked to share their thoughts on what is included in the Plan. A period of public comment on the draft will follow the virtual meeting. All Bethlehem residents and businesses are encouraged to provide comments on the draft Plan, which will be posted on the City’s website.

Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan will establish local priorities for reducing the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global climate change while locally improving public health, protecting Bethlehem’s environment, and strengthening the city’s economy. The Plan will also include a climate hazard vulnerability assessment and outline measures, policies, and strategies the City, its businesses, and residents can take to reduce climate-related risks, such as increased flooding and extreme temperatures.

Drum roll! Draft Climate Action Plan debuts December 9

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

At City Council Tuesday night, Councilman Reynolds, who initiated plans for the CAP, reminded us of the important meeting coming up next week.

Full Description here

register here

The City of Bethlehem will host an online forum on Wednesday, December 9, to present a draft of the City’s Climate Action Plan. The Plan, which is being developed throughout 2020, will outline measures, policies, and strategies the City can support to reduce Bethlehem’s contribution to climate change and to adapt to the risks of a changing climate, such as extreme temperatures.

During the online forum, the City and consultants WSP and Nurture Nature Center will introduce the draft of Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan, including its objectives, strategies, and proposed implementation approach. The Plan addresses a range of sectors, from buildings to transportation to education, with a focus on environmental justice considerations. Participants will then be asked to share their thoughts on what is included in the Plan. A period of public comment on the draft will follow the virtual meeting. All Bethlehem residents and businesses are encouraged to provide comments on the draft Plan, which will be posted on the City’s website.

Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan will establish local priorities for reducing the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global climate change while locally improving public health, protecting Bethlehem’s environment, and strengthening the city’s economy. The Plan will also include a climate hazard vulnerability assessment and outline measures, policies, and strategies the City, its businesses, and residents can take to reduce climate-related risks, such as increased flooding and extreme temperatures.

Contribute to the Climate Action Plan!

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

Gadfly calls attention to Hannah Provost’s detailed article in Southsider about the second community meeting October 7 on the developing Climate Action Plan.

Gadfly called attention to this important meeting, but there is much more substantive information in Hannah’s article.

The key thing is that we now have the opportunity to provide input to the draft plan that will be presented at the next public meeting.

Gadfly encourages you to read Hannah’s article and to make your contributions.

Time is short.

Input will be accepted through Sunday, November 1.

Hannah Provost, “Bethlehem Seeks Community Response to Climate Action Plan.” Southsider, October 27, 2020.

“The City of Bethlehem and consultant WSP are actively constructing the Bethlehem Climate Action Plan (CAP), and currently are seeking community feedback about their proposal. On October 7th, 2020, the City hosted the second community-wide webinar during the design process. The October CAP community meeting presented the progress for the design of the CAP based on the previous community response, and further garnered community input, this time on more specific possibilities and strategies. In November, the design committee, lead by Jeff Irvine, for the Bethlehem Climate Action Plan will present a draft of the plan to the community in a third webinar, with an opportunity for further feedback. Ultimately, the full plan is scheduled to be completed by the first quarter of 2021. This article captures the ongoing community dialogue about strategies for city wide environmental justice, and highlights further opportunities for the reader to have their voice heard and contribute to the construction of the Climate Action Plan.”

To identify climate hazards facing Bethlehem on our community map, visit map.bethlehemcap.org. (1-2 minutes)

To review the plan’s full list of draft strategies and indicate your priorities, visit survey.bethlehemcap.org (As little as 5-10 minutes)

Residents chatter about the Climate Action Plan around Gadfly’s water cooler

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

  • I believe that these large warehouses should be required to have electric plug-in stations for the semis that transport products so they don’t need to park and idle all over the place while drivers rest.
  • I’m thinking about large rental communities involving the amount of recyclable materials that I see hauled away from trash dumpsters. Any residential property over 4 units is considered commercial and triggers different recycling requirements. More metal, cardboard, plastic, newsprint, and flatboard gets trashed than anyone can imagine. Resident renters at the Townhouses where I live are completely lackadaisical about separating recycling from trash.
  • Those warehouses are a mixed blessing — and from a sustainability POV, almost a curse when you consider megatons of freight moving by truck right through the LV.
Anything you want to chatter about?

Past resident input into the developing CAP

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

At the first CAP meeting, resident input was solicited, and here Kate Semmens, a consultant, uses these 4 slides to report on that input and how it was incorporated into the process (4 mins.):

to be continued . . .

What is a CAP, and where are we in the development process?

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

Consultant Jeff Irvine concisely describes what our CAP is and what its goals and benefits are (2 mins:)

Here Jeff indicates where we are in the process. We’re at the “tail end” — there will be another public meeting in late November or December and publication of the plan will come early in the new year (1 min.):

to be continued . . .

CAP meeting seeks citizen input

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

Climate Action Plan

Indicate your priorities and comment on the plan’s proposed goals and strategies using this survey by November 1. If doing the survey in stages, be sure to click “submit,” or your work will not save till the next time.

Help identify climate-related hazards and impacts in your neighborhood and community, such as extreme heat and flooding, using this community map by November 1.

Yesterday’s second public meeting on our Climate Action Plan was aimed mainly at laying out strategies and gathering citizen input on them. Please note the two opportunities linked at the top of this page where you can provide that input by doing a survey and by mapping potential hot spots.

A recording of this program will no doubt be provided in timely fashion, but Gadfly is going to jump in and take a post or two to invite you to get involved if you weren’t in attendance or if you want to review.

Jeff Irvine, consultant, lays out the purpose of the meeting (one min.):

Councilman Willie Reynolds, the driving force behind our CAP, says a few words of welcome (2 mins.):

Matt Dorner, Deputy Director of Public Works, brings us up to date on the substantial good work that the City has already accomplished in the area of sustainability (4 mins.):

to be continued . . .

Pennsylvania doesn’t teach about climate change

Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan

Bethlehem is developing a Climate Action Plan (CAP) to address climate change by identifying policies and programs that will mitigate our contribution to climate change and help the city adapt to the effects of a changing climate, including extreme heat and flooding. The second public planning meeting for the CAP will be held virtually on Wednesday, October 7th. Mark your calendars. Gadfly will be posting details shortly.

Tip o’ the hat to the Touchstone Theatre’s “Speak out!” sustainability forum last night (part of Festival UnBound). Gadfly hopes to post here some of the student presentations from the forum in the near future.

———-

selections from Paul Muschick, “As wildfires rage, Pennsylvania and 3 other states don’t teach about climate change.” Morning Call, September 17, 2020.
(The headline for this article in the print edition Sept. 20 is “Pa. schools still don’t teach about climate change.”)

Pennsylvania is getting hotter and wetter. But in Pennsylvania schools, there’s no requirement that students learn that their actions are contributing to it by changing the climate.

The state is one of only four without science education standards to teach that people cause global warming, a problem that’s difficult to ignore as California wildfires burn out of control.

The goal is to implement the standards in the 2024-25 school year, to give schools time to develop curriculum.

The proposal still has to go through a public comment period, then needs approval from the Independent Regulatory Review Commission, a five-member board appointed by the Legislature and governor.

There’s plenty of evidence [climate change is] real, and that something must be done.

A national climate assessment researched and written by 13 federal agencies in 2018 concluded: “Earth’s climate is now changing faster than at any point in the history of modern civilization, primarily as a result of human activities.”

Doing something to solve the problem starts with teaching people the facts. That’s why it’s important for climate change, and its causes, to be discussed in our schools.

The proposal advanced last week was drafted over the past year. Input was gathered from teachers, students, college professors, business and community leaders and others at 14 stakeholder meetings, including one in the Lehigh Valley that was held virtually in March because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The update is broad and covers many topics. Lessons about how people impact the environment was one of the top suggestions from those who offered input. Proposed standards include:

Kindergarten: Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air and/or other living things in the local environment.

Grades 3 to 5: Describe human-caused changes that affect the immediate environment as well as other places, other people and future times.

Grades 6 to 8: Ask questions to clarify evidence of the factors that have caused the rise in global temperatures over the past century. Apply scientific principles to design a method for monitoring and minimizing human impact on the environment. Construct an argument supported by evidence for how increases in human population and per capita consumption of natural resources impact Earth’s systems.

Grades 9 to 12: Evaluate or refine a technological solution that reduces impacts of human activities on natural systems. Use a computational representation to illustrate the relationships among Earth systems and how those relationships are being modified due to human activity.

Climate change is a sticky subject under the Capitol dome in Harrisburg, where deniers have been invited to testify at legislative hearings. So I wouldn’t be surprised if some lawmakers tried to squash the plan.

Some Republican lawmakers say the program would cost the economy hundreds of millions of dollars, with some of the costs being passed on to consumers, and plants and related businesses eventually closing, resulting in job losses.

There surely would be costs. But there’s also great cost to doing nothing.

Requiring students to be taught about global warming and climate change would be another big step. Maybe some bright young minds will come up with other ways to tackle the problem that older generations have ignored for too long.

It’s Sunday, September 20, do you know where your Climate Action Plan is? Yep!

June 17 Climate Action Plan meeting slides and transcription now available

logo Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan logo

Gadfly knows that some of you tried to participate in the webinar but ran into
technical problems, Now you can catch up!

BethlehemCAP.org

CAP 5

  • First Public Virtual Meeting: June 17, 2020 – Completed
  • The first public meeting on the CAP was held as a webinar at two separate times on June 17 to maximize accessibility. If you missed the sessions, please see the materials below:
  • During the meeting, consultants WSP and Nurture Nature Center reviewed the projected impacts of climate change on Bethlehem, introduced the climate action planning process, and provided information about actions the City has already taken to address climate change. Participants were then asked to share their thoughts on the goals and priorities they hope to see reflected in the plan.
  • Additional public meetings are planned for September and November. Details will be published here when these dates are announced.

It’s Friday, June 26, do you know where your Climate Action Plan is? Yep!

Impressive Climate Action Plan webinar

logo Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan logo

Gadfly:

I attended the [Climate Action Plan] webinar yesterday [Wednesday] at noon and was very impressed with the thoroughness of the presentation (and the presenters).

The first portion clearly elucidated the factual evidence that the climate is warming at a rapid rate, that human activity is the primary cause, that we can document the changes that are already occurring, and that the future effects will be even more dramatic: no winter sports in PA (Bethlehem’s climate will be like that of Richmond, VA, today); more ticks and other disease-bearing pests; loss of some agricultural crops (like apples); more heavy rainstorms and thus flooding.

That the team is serious about creating an action plan to decrease the worst-case scenarios if we do nothing to minimize the negative effects of global warming that we are stuck with and to delineating means for us to adjust and be resilient to the effects we cannot minimize was very clear.

They are interested in including ALL aspects of the Bethlehem community (I guess except for those who deny the obvious science-based conclusions) in both creating the plan and carrying it out.

Is the process slow and somewhat cumbersome? Yes, it is, but it also seeks to emerge with the greatest chances of successful implementation because of the broad input.

I look forward to the next steps and applaud my community for taking such an important step!

J. D. Smullen

The first public meeting on the Climate Action Plan

logo Latest in a series on Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan logo

Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan
BethlehemCAP.org

CITY OF BETHLEHEM
STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT PLAN FOR CLIMATE ACTION PLAN DEVELOPMENT

Pandemic — George Floyd — Rayshard Brooks — Global Warming

So many crises buffeting us these days. Shell-shocking. Easy to lose sight of the two virtual public meetings hosted yesterday by Bethlehem-based engineering firm WSP and science-based community center Nurture Nature Center (NNC), located in Easton, who were selected as consultants to develop the Bethlehem Climate Action Plan. We expect that the slides from yesterday’s meetings and perhaps some audio/video will eventually be available on the Bethlehem CAP web site.

CAP 2

WSP will lead the CAP project and provide world-class subject-matter climate and engineering expertise. WSP is the subject-matter expert. WSP will work with NNC to advise the City on strategies related to communicating progress with the project process and gathering public input. NNC will develop engagement strategies. NNC looks like the communication expert. Public engagement seems to be a key element in the development of the CAP.

CAP 3

According to the tentative schedule (already modified) the final CAP is due during the first quarter of 2021. Looks like the first meeting of the working group (CAP WG) has already occurred. At least two more public meetings are planned.

CAP 4

As mentioned above, we hope that some audio/video from the public meetings will eventually be provided on the Bethlehem CAP web site. But, for now, your technologically challenged Gadfly can only provide this awful audio of the meeting hosts describing the “What is in a  Climate Action Plan?” slide above. You will need to vacuum out your ear wax, turn your speaker to 100%, and glue yourself to the speaker. The sound gets a little better after the first minute or two but not much. On the other hand, you might want to just skip the whole damn lousy audio. Sorry.

Gadfly would love to hear from people who are actively involved in the climate movement and, especially, who attended the virtual meeting. Those who attended the meeting might tell us what they contributed to the discussion section of the session.

He knows you’re out there!

Tip o’ the hat to Councilman Reynolds, the Environmental Advisory Council, Mayor Hatlo 2Donchez, Michael Alkhal, and, of course, many others on the City staff for getting us to this significant point.

Public needed at Climate Action Plan meeting Wednesday

logo The latest in a series of posts relating to the environment, Bethlehem’s Climate
Action Plan, and Bethlehem’s Environmental Advisory Council
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Bethlehem Climate Action Plan Public Virtual Meeting

Virtual Meeting Registration

CAP 1

————–

from Christina Tatu, “Bethlehem asks for public’s input on Climate Action Plan.” June 15, 2020.

Once known for Bethlehem Steel, with its towering blast furnaces that sent plumes of smoke into the sky and a coating of ore dust into surrounding neighborhoods, Bethlehem has done a lot to clean up its image.

Over the last 15 years, the city has reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by nearly 40%, and by the end of the year officials are hoping to have a climate action plan to make Bethlehem even more environmentally friendly. There will be two forums Wednesday to gather public input for the plan, which was proposed by Councilman J. William Reynolds in 2017.

When finished, the plan will outline policies the city can support to reduce its carbon footprint, or the amount of greenhouse gasses it produces that cause climate change. The plan will also analyze hazards the city could face from climate change, such as increased temperatures and flooding, and it will outline measures local businesses and residents can take to reduce their environmental impact.

Wednesday’s forums will include information about what the city has done to reduce emissions and will ask residents what they see as the most important goals going forward, said Jeffrey Irvine, a project director with WSP.

A group of stakeholders has also been discussing what the goals should be, Reynolds said. The group of about 50 includes members of the public, representatives from Moravian College and Lehigh University, local business owners and environmental proponents.

Proposals include encouraging restaurants to limit foam and plastic packaging with takeout orders and using local ingredients, said Lynn Rothman, chairwoman of Bethlehem’s Environmental Advisory Council, who is also a stakeholder.

The group also wants to see the city hire a sustainability officer to help implement any environmental policies that are developed.

The City reminds us of the June 17 Climate Action Plan forum

logo The latest in a series of posts relating to the environment, Bethlehem’s Climate
Action Plan, and Bethlehem’s Environmental Advisory Council
logo

Easy to forget about this with all the drama going on.
But this is historic! Don’t miss!

Press Release:

June 9, 2020 

City of Bethlehem to host first public forum on Climate Action Plan Online

Mayor Bob Donchez announced today that the City of Bethlehem will host an online forum on Wednesday, June 17, to inform the public of the development of the City’s Climate Action Plan. The Plan, which will be developed throughout 2020, will outline measures, policies, and strategies the City can support to reduce Bethlehem’s contribution to climate change and to adapt to the risks of a changing climate, such as extreme temperatures.

To maximize accessibility, the 90-minute virtual meeting will be held twice, at both 12:00pm and 5:30pm. Each session will cover the same content. Members of the public are encouraged to register for the session that is most convenient for them at the following web address: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/7859566807906925067

Bethlehem’s Climate Action Plan will establish local priorities for reducing the greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global climate change while locally improving public health, protecting Bethlehem’s environment, and strengthening the city’s economy. The Plan will also include a climate hazard vulnerability assessment and outline measures, policies, and strategies the City, its businesses, and residents can take to reduce climate-related risks, such as increased flooding and extreme temperatures.

At the June 17 forum the City and consultants WSP and Nurture Nature Center will introduce the climate action planning process and provide information about actions the City has already taken to address climate change. Participants will then be asked to share their thoughts on the goals and priorities they hope to see reflected in the plan which will be released in early 2021.

The public can learn more about the planning process and provide additional input via a short online survey at the following web address: https://www.bethlehem-pa.gov/Public-Works/Climate-Action-Plan

The City of Bethlehem has a long history of supporting climate action and leading by example. The Mayor and City Council have committed Bethlehem to the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate and Energy, the We Are Still In initiative, the Sierra Club’s Mayors For 100% Clean Energy, and the Mayors National Climate Action Agenda. The City government has also implemented numerous greenhouse gas reduction initiatives, ranging from energy efficiency to renewable energy purchasing, which have reduced the City’s contribution to climate change from municipal operations 37 percent from 2005 to 2017.

Bethlehem City Council unanimously passed a Resolution endorsing the creation of a Climate Action Plan. Mayor Donchez’s administration, through the Public Works department, issued a request for proposals for climate action plan preparation in June 2019. Bethlehem-based engineering firm WSP and science-based community center Nurture Nature Center, located in Easton, were selected as consultants to develop the Plan in 2020 with input from Bethlehem’s public, businesses and stakeholders.

Reminder! “What should Climate Action look like in Bethlehem?” Calendar alert! June 17

logo The latest in a series of posts relating to the environment, Bethlehem’s Climate
Action Plan, and Bethlehem’s Environmental Advisory Council
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BethlehemCAP.org

CAP 1

register:
https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/7859566807906925067

survey:
English: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScUs6b4mVs73mq4rKHLtnH7VTKyZzNXvRdt_T-ynnJKqjvvTA/viewform
Spanish: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLScaBqqi6eanUm-rpzEoGSD_FbbMa4aAiBi0yxox4Hl0rAs2dQ/viewform