Never enough H. D.! Thursday, February 13, 6:30-7:45, BAPL South Side

logo Latest in a series of posts on the Arts in Bethlehem logo

Bethlehem-born writer Hilda Doolittle — H. D. —  (1886-1961) is
the “Lehigh Valley’s most important literary figure.”

Never enough H. D.!

HD discussion

And Mock Turtle Marionette Theatre’s original play The Secret about H. D., which premiered during Festival UnBound in October, returns April 2-5. Get your tickets early! Don’t miss!
Touchstone Theatre

Never enough H. D.! Thursday, February 13, 6:30-7:45, BAPL South Side

logo Latest in a series of posts on the Arts in Bethlehem logo

Bethlehem-born writer Hilda Doolittle — H. D. —  (1886-1961) is
the “Lehigh Valley’s most important literary figure.”

Never enough H. D.!

HD discussion

And Mock Turtle Marionette Theatre’s original play The Secret about H. D., which premiered during Festival UnBound in October, returns April 2-5. Get your tickets early! Don’t miss!
Touchstone Theatre

H. D. portrait by Angela Fraleigh unveiled

logo Latest in a series of posts on the Arts in Bethlehem logo

Tip o’ the hat to Gadfly followers who contributed for the H.D. portrait through the BAPL go-fund me page and to the Laros Foundation for pitching in in a big way.

Bethlehem Area Public Library Receives Grant from R.K. Laros Foundation
for Portrait of H.D.

BETHLEHEM, PA (January 28, 2020) — The Bethlehem Area Public Library (BAPL) is pleased to announce it has received a grant from the R.K. Laros Foundation to support the library’s recently completed portrait commission of local literary legend H.D. (Hilda Doolittle), painted by local artist Angela Fraleigh, professor and chair of the Moravian College Art Department. The grant was presented to BAPL Executive Director Josh Berk and Chair of the Board of Trustees Anne Felker on Wednesday, January 22, by Laros Executive Director Sharon Jones Zondag and Trustees Ron Madison and Elizabeth Shimer Bowers. The Laros Foundation is “pleased to be a part of [the Library’s] mission to preserve our shared history and to bring the community into the vivid life of our local library.”

———–

BAPL’s Josh Berk hosted a “sneak preview” of the H. D. portrait last Saturday at the library.

(Gadfly apologizes for the lousy photo quality, captured from video taken with poor lighting. Portrait better seen on the videos below.)

H. D. 1

H. D. (Hilda Doolittle)
Angela Fraleigh

Video highlights of the “sneak preview”:

  • BAPL director Josh Berk sketches the history of the Finding H. D. project and the portrait with Doug Roysdon’s “H. D.” marionette watching over his shoulder.
  • Artist Angela Fraleigh unveils the portrait.
  • Fraleigh talks a bit about her work.
  • Actors Will Reichard-Flynn and Aidan Gilrain-McKenna, with Liam McKenna on trumpet, perform a scene from “The Secret,” an original play about H. D. that premiered during Festival UnBound in October.
  • Some audience members chatting about the portrait.

“The Secret,” devised by Mock Turtle Marionette Theater Company, directed by Jennie Gilrain, puppetmaker and chief playwright Doug Roysdon, returns April 2-5 at Touchstone Theatre, 321 East 4th Street, Bethlehem. Reservations:  610-867-1689, or lisa@touchstone.org
Touchstone Theatre

More stories of Bethlehem women in leadership roles: stereotypes and epiphanies

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The Secret

The Secret begins one day, in late nineteenth century Bethlehem, when sixteen year-old, Helen Wolle, mother of H.D., entered a Moravian Seminary classroom to rehearse a song she looked forward to performing. Much to her shock and, in fact, trauma, she was roughly told to be quiet, to end “this dreadful noise” by her pastor grandfather, Papalie. And Helen, who loved to sing so much and so well, would never sing again in public. The focus of the panel will be on women in leadership. We will connect the panel to the play via a question that Mamalie (Hilda’s maternal grandmother) asks Hilda in the beginning of the play, and H.D. asks the audience at the end of the play: “Who will follow the music?” 

Here are two more participants on the panel that followed a Festival Unbound performance of “The Secret,” the play about H. D.’s life. Moderator Jennie Gilrain gave the eight panelists about five minutes each to talk about their “dreams, hopes, works” and perhaps to recount a time when they were “encouraged or inspired or discouraged and oppressed from following your music.” Gadfly should have said last time that short biographies of these women can be found here.

Nancy Matos Gonzalez ran into the generational wall that college is for the boys but was fortunate to meet a woman who acted as her advocate and mentor. When running for office, she realized that she had to work harder after a man told her that Puerto Rican women are only interested in sex and their men are all on drugs.

Dr. Paige Van Wirt’s story is a story of epiphanies, one saying “O, my god, that’s my path” out of a soul-crushing job as a bond analyst after watching a movie in which a woman wants to be a doctor, and the another saying “I can do that” after leaving a City Council meeting angry and outraged.

to be continued . . .

Festival UnBound
Closed but never forgotten

H. D.: Gadfly recycles

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Gadfly found this message crumpled on the floor of Touchstone Theatre after a performance of “The Secret,” the original play on H. D.’s life performed during the Festival UnBound.

A message apparently unheeded.

H. D.: in the last two posts, you’ve seen what you can admire and what she can inspire.

https://www.bapl.org/hd/

017

https://www.bapl.org/hd/

H. D.: what it feels like when what was so much is suddenly empty

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Bethlehem-born writer Hilda Doolittle — H. D. —  (1886-1961) is
the “Lehigh Valley’s most important literary figure.”

You have read the poem, now listen to this–

my god . . .

——

Nevermore Will the Wind

Musical setting of H.D.’s poem

Fri Oct 25, 8 pm 

Sat Oct 26, 8 pm 

Zoellner Arts Center

420 E Packer Ave, Bethlehem

From composer Steven Sametz of Lehigh

University with 200 singers and orchestra. 

Also Faure Requiem

H. D.: “Never more will the wind / cherish you again”

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Bethlehem-born writer Hilda Doolittle — H. D. —  (1886-1961) is
the “Lehigh Valley’s most important literary figure.”

“Master,” said the Grasshopper, “what good is poetry?”

“Wait, Grasshopper,” said the Master, “till you have suffered loss. And then you will know.”

—–

Never more will the wind
cherish you again,
never more will the rain.

Never more
shall we find you bright
in the snow and wind.

The snow is melted,
the snow is gone,
and you are flown:

Like a bird out of our hand,
like a light out of our heart,
you are gone.

H. D.

Let this little poem by our Bethlehem poet whom we have discovered and celebrated all year sink in for an hour. Then come back to Gadfly again.